CSOA Revoltosa, a squatted social center in Barcelona. Check out more photos here.

CSOA Revoltosa, a squatted social center in Barcelona. Check out more photos here.

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4 notes | Tags: squat  barcelona  spain  community  alternative  okupa  
"The most objective metric of ‘livability’ in cities is probably the rate at which friends happen to run into one another on the sidewalk."
— (via
secretrepublic)

(via urbnfutr)

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129 notes | Tags: cities  friendship  community  livabiliity  
thisbigcity:

Let This Big City take you on a tour of New York…
請讓城事帶你逛紐約…

thisbigcity:

Let This Big City take you on a tour of New York…

請讓城事帶你逛紐約…

(Source: thisbigcity)

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12 notes | Tags: homebuilding  nyc  community voices  community  

razorshapes:

Time by John Clang

A series that involves recording a location, to show the passing of time in a montage style. There is a sense of intimate intricacy of how time moves, and how people, albeit in a different time, are actually closer to one another and traveling in the same shared space. I’ve always been intrigued by the constant subtle changes in my urban environment. 

(via urbanehood)

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371 notes | Tags: public space  shared space  community  
urbalize:

Read about a nice example of citizens reclaiming and improving a heavily neglected public space. Even more at their blog

urbalize:

Read about a nice example of citizens reclaiming and improving a heavily neglected public space. Even more at their blog

(Source: urbalize)

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7 notes | Tags: morus  reclaimed urban space  community  public space  
Liz Christy in 1975, in one of the Lower East Side gardens she started. Photo by Donald Loggins. 
“The collective work of homesteaders and squatters to stabilize an environment of spiraling decline was joined by the Lower East Side’s community garden movement, which sought to reclaim turf from encroaching urban blight. The resident gardeners set out to transform vacant lots strewn with trash, bricks, old appliances, and automobiles into green spaces. The movement’s first community garden began in 1973, when a group of residents threw balloons containing plant seeds and bulbs into a large fenced-in parcel on Houston Street near Bowery. The activists, who called themselves Green Guerillas, assisted local residents and block associations in starting gardens and, at times, gaining permission to use city-owned properties…”
- Christopher Mele, Selling the Lower East Side: Culture, Real Estate, and Resistance in New York City.

Liz Christy in 1975, in one of the Lower East Side gardens she started. Photo by Donald Loggins. 

“The collective work of homesteaders and squatters to stabilize an environment of spiraling decline was joined by the Lower East Side’s community garden movement, which sought to reclaim turf from encroaching urban blight. The resident gardeners set out to transform vacant lots strewn with trash, bricks, old appliances, and automobiles into green spaces. The movement’s first community garden began in 1973, when a group of residents threw balloons containing plant seeds and bulbs into a large fenced-in parcel on Houston Street near Bowery. The activists, who called themselves Green Guerillas, assisted local residents and block associations in starting gardens and, at times, gaining permission to use city-owned properties…”

- Christopher Mele, Selling the Lower East Side: Culture, Real Estate, and Resistance in New York City.

(Source: morusnyc.org)

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5 notes | Tags: Community  Garden  MoRUS  Photograph  
“’Placemaking’ is both an overarching idea and a hands-on tool for improving a neighborhood, city or region. It has the potential to be one of the most transformative ideas of this century.” -Metropolitan Planning Council of Chicago
An interesting article that highlights community grassroots participation and suggests innovative means of better integrating cities with its residents.

“’Placemaking’ is both an overarching idea and a hands-on tool for improving a neighborhood, city or region. It has the potential to be one of the most transformative ideas of this century.” -Metropolitan Planning Council of Chicago

An interesting article that highlights community grassroots participation and suggests innovative means of better integrating cities with its residents.

(Source: pps.org)

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6 notes | Tags: City  Community  MoRUS  Article  News  

massurban:

What Citizens Add to Planning

Kaid Benfield. Jan 6, 2012.

The video at the end of this post is a rare and engaging inside peek at two planning workshops in the small, historic city of Belfast (population 6,658) and the town of Lincolnville (population 2,042), both in Maine. The most eloquent voices in the room are not professional planners, but ordinary citizens who care about their community, raising such issues as how their streets function, building facades, walkability, places for seniors and kids, safety, and the like. 

I really like it as an example of what real folks – not just we enviros and “urban wonks” – care about, as well as what a citizen planning session feels like. The workshops were hosted in October 2011 by the local nonprofit Friends of Midcoast Maine, in partnership with the Orton Family Foundation and The Project for Public Spaces, assisted by Vermont-based planner Paul Dreher.  

Friends of Midcoast Maine, led by my friend Jane LaFleur, is organized “to help Midcoast communities plan for a vibrant and sustainable future. [The group is] an independent resource that provides expertise in support of smart growth principles.” More specifically, according to a recent annual report, it provides education, workshops and technical assistance; project endorsements and advocacy for sound planning and sensible growth. It works along a stretch running roughly 100 miles northeast from Brunswick to Bucksport and including many historic communities.”

Via: The Atlantic

Video: Friends of Midcoast Maine

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8 notes | Tags: Community  Video  Urbanism