jdbroderick:

1 CAR SPACE = 10 BICYCLES
A handsome, functional, and thought-provoking bike rack.
lifebetweenbuildings:

1 car space = 10 bicycles

jdbroderick:

1 CAR SPACE = 10 BICYCLES

A handsome, functional, and thought-provoking bike rack.

lifebetweenbuildings:

1 car space = 10 bicycles

(via urbnfutr)

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264 notes | Tags: cycling  bicycles  sustainable cities  reclaimed urban space  
nyc-arts:

ART IS FOR EVERYONE. Keith Haring exhibition at Brooklyn Museum

nyc-arts:

ART IS FOR EVERYONE. Keith Haring exhibition at Brooklyn Museum

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16 notes | Tags: public art  keith haring  nyc  public space  reclaimed urban space  

labespaciopublico:

Xylo[phone] by Anuardi and Yailene with the help pf Wilfredo, Jubilee and Bea. First exercise for the project Thoughtless Monuments created by Isabel Ramirez Pagan in collaboration with UrbanoActivo for this first experiment. The project transformed an unused and broken down phone booth into a musical instrument using pvc tubes to create an urban xylophone.  

(via urbnist)

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50 notes | Tags: reclaimed urban space  public space  public art  music  xylophone  

inspirezme:

‘Mark Reigelman and Jenny Chapman’s Manifest Destiny! is a temporary rustic cabin occupying one of the last remaining unclaimed spaces of downtown San Francisco—above and between other properties. Using a 19th-century architectural style and vintage building materials, the structure is both homage to the romantic spirit of the Western Myth and a commentary on the arrogance of Westward expansion. The cabin, hanging oddly from the side of a building, seems to represent the impossibility of the successful fulfillment of manifest destiny. A nation cannot be built on both opportunity and entitlement.’

 Images © Mark Reigelman & Jenny Chapman | Via: Zeutch

(via urbanehood)

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167 notes | Tags: unclaimed urban space  reclaimed urban space  urban  

periferiadomestica:

MOSS CROSS  /  A cross made from Moss was created for The Urban Physic Garden. A temporary community project built and designed by artists, designers and architects to promote nature and its power to heal. Moss contains healing properties and was often used to treat wounds during world war II, it has an anti-bacterial quality in that it is very acidic and may have been responsible for saving thousands of lives during the war. Because of its ability to retain water, dry sphagnum moss makes an excellent sponge. Sphagnum wound dressings can be 3–4 times as aborbent as cotton equivalents. The plant can be used as an antiseptic, and medicines made with this are used to treat skin conditions.

Text and images by Anna Garforth

(via urbnist)

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55 notes | Tags: urban garden  reclaimed urban space  
massurban:

” Making Buildings Work: the Greenpoint Manufacturing and Design Center
Between 2002 and 2010, the United States suffered a 25 percent reduction in the number of manufacturing jobs. Over the same period, New York City experienced a 46 percent loss of approximately 64,000 manufacturing jobs.[1] The high costs of real estate and labor certainly inhibit large-scale mass production operations from remaining in or choosing to locate in New York. But a combination of specific land use policy decisions and speculative real estate development practices has further constrained the supply of industrial buildings and therefore accelerated the decline of the kind of middle class job opportunities that manufacturing has historically provided to New Yorkers: stable, skilled and well-paid. According to the New York Industrial Retention Network (an economic development and advocacy organization that is now a project of the Pratt Center for Community Development), between 2001 and 2008, approved rezonings removed 23.4 million square feet of industrial space from New York City. So, while the assembly line production plants — businesses that don’t benefit from proximity to New York’s markets — have migrated to other parts of the country and the world over the past few decades, a new breed of manufacturers — small-scale, artisanal and oriented to local markets – have struggled to find space to make stuff.
Enter the Greenpoint Manufacturing and Design Center (GMDC), a non-profit industrial developer that over the past twenty years has rehabilitated six North Brooklyn buildings and made more than 750,000 square feet of space available to small manufacturers, artisans and artists. The 99 businesses currently operating in GMDC facilities currently employ over 500 people. In addition to the local economic development benefits, the environmental advantages of retrofitting existing buildings to enable the production of local goods by local workers are huge. The greenest building, after all, is the one you have already. GMDC’s model is starting to receive attention from other cities around the country eager to help bring industrial jobs back to their communities. We sat down with Brian Coleman, CEO of GMDC, to discuss this model, the changing nature of manufacturing and the increasing challenges to making buildings that respond to cultural, demographic and economic shifts in urban industry.”
Via: Urban Omnibus
Photo: courtesy of the Greenpoint Manufacturing and Design Center.

massurban:

” Making Buildings Work: the Greenpoint Manufacturing and Design Center

Between 2002 and 2010, the United States suffered a 25 percent reduction in the number of manufacturing jobs. Over the same period, New York City experienced a 46 percent loss of approximately 64,000 manufacturing jobs.[1] The high costs of real estate and labor certainly inhibit large-scale mass production operations from remaining in or choosing to locate in New York. But a combination of specific land use policy decisions and speculative real estate development practices has further constrained the supply of industrial buildings and therefore accelerated the decline of the kind of middle class job opportunities that manufacturing has historically provided to New Yorkers: stable, skilled and well-paid. According to the New York Industrial Retention Network (an economic development and advocacy organization that is now a project of the Pratt Center for Community Development), between 2001 and 2008, approved rezonings removed 23.4 million square feet of industrial space from New York City. So, while the assembly line production plants — businesses that don’t benefit from proximity to New York’s markets — have migrated to other parts of the country and the world over the past few decades, a new breed of manufacturers — small-scale, artisanal and oriented to local markets – have struggled to find space to make stuff.

Enter the Greenpoint Manufacturing and Design Center (GMDC), a non-profit industrial developer that over the past twenty years has rehabilitated six North Brooklyn buildings and made more than 750,000 square feet of space available to small manufacturers, artisans and artists. The 99 businesses currently operating in GMDC facilities currently employ over 500 people. In addition to the local economic development benefits, the environmental advantages of retrofitting existing buildings to enable the production of local goods by local workers are huge. The greenest building, after all, is the one you have already. GMDC’s model is starting to receive attention from other cities around the country eager to help bring industrial jobs back to their communities. We sat down with Brian Coleman, CEO of GMDC, to discuss this model, the changing nature of manufacturing and the increasing challenges to making buildings that respond to cultural, demographic and economic shifts in urban industry.”

Via: Urban Omnibus

Photo: courtesy of the Greenpoint Manufacturing and Design Center.


Comments
9 notes | Tags: morus  reclaimed urban space  nyc  
urbalize:

Read about a nice example of citizens reclaiming and improving a heavily neglected public space. Even more at their blog

urbalize:

Read about a nice example of citizens reclaiming and improving a heavily neglected public space. Even more at their blog

(Source: urbalize)

Comments
7 notes | Tags: morus  reclaimed urban space  community  public space