sfmoma:


Ever since R. Buckminster Fuller popularized the design in the mid-20th century, there’s been something captivating about the geodesic dome. While the structure typically makes architecture lovers salivate, now it’s conquering the heart of another type of urbanist: the city farmer. A new dome-based prototype promises an affordable method of rooftop aquaculture for apartment and commercial buildings—as the website calls it, getting “fish from the sky.” 

(via A Geodesic Dome Promises Fish from the Sky - GOOD)

sfmoma:

Ever since R. Buckminster Fuller popularized the design in the mid-20th century, there’s been something captivating about the geodesic dome. While the structure typically makes architecture lovers salivate, now it’s conquering the heart of another type of urbanist: the city farmer. A new dome-based prototype promises an affordable method of rooftop aquaculture for apartment and commercial buildings—as the website calls it, getting “fish from the sky.”

(via A Geodesic Dome Promises Fish from the Sky - GOOD)

(via verticaltheory)

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92 notes | Tags: urban homestead  urban garden  urban farming  

periferiadomestica:

MOSS CROSS  /  A cross made from Moss was created for The Urban Physic Garden. A temporary community project built and designed by artists, designers and architects to promote nature and its power to heal. Moss contains healing properties and was often used to treat wounds during world war II, it has an anti-bacterial quality in that it is very acidic and may have been responsible for saving thousands of lives during the war. Because of its ability to retain water, dry sphagnum moss makes an excellent sponge. Sphagnum wound dressings can be 3–4 times as aborbent as cotton equivalents. The plant can be used as an antiseptic, and medicines made with this are used to treat skin conditions.

Text and images by Anna Garforth

(via urbnist)

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55 notes | Tags: urban garden  reclaimed urban space